Spain

Spain

A new First Steps Family Enrichment course started in Alcala de Henares, Madrid. More than 30 young parents took part in the first training session, which was held on November 18. More than 250 courses are held in Spain every year, with around 5,000 families taking part. More information (in...
Training in Hong Kong

Training in Hong Kong

A one-day moderator training course was held in Hong Kong in early September 2016. About 75 people attended the course which was divided into four teams: one English-speaking, one Mandarin-speaking and two Chinese-Cantonese-speaking. Spanish moderators Josemaria Postigo & Rosa Pich were invited by the Family First Foundation (FFF), the entity which coordinates IFFD courses in China and Hong Kong, to conduct this moderator training which had simultaneous translation, from Spanish to English and from Spanish to Chinese Mandarin, during the seminar presentation. For the case study team discussions, the group was divided into four teams: one English-speaking, one Mandarin-speaking and two Chinese-Cantonese-speaking. It was a new experience for FFF organizers to coordinate team meetings in two dialects and two languages at the same time. It was a happy and productive day, with families and children of different nationalities and cultures taking part, and the participants enjoyed the opportunity to exchange experiences and ideas, as well as learning a lot from the full-day training. As a result of the training, a new course on Marital Love in Hong Kong Island is being organized by some of the...
Pilot program in Korea

Pilot program in Korea

On October 29, the first IFFD course in Korea began, in the city of Seoul. The course in question is a pilot course for the First Steps program, which will be delivered with the help of national and international experts. IFFD is very excited about this new...
IFFD Paper 59

IFFD Paper 59

Measuring children and youth well-being Are society’s youngest and most vulnerable overlooked? Signed more than two thirds of a century ago, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights ushered in a civil rights revolution. But there was a fatal oversight: society’s youngest and most vulnerable — children — were overlooked. Fifty years later, the Convention on the Rights of the Child tried to fill that gap — “In all actions concerning children, whether undertaken by public or private social welfare institutions, courts of law, administrative authorities or legislative bodies, the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration.” But 25 years after, the world is still falling short in its promise and commitment to ensure the right to a safe childhood. We can say that the Convention on the Rights of the Child worked to fill this void, the document remains a statement of good intent rather than a blueprint for action. Download...